Posts

Showing posts from October, 2017

Grade Seven: Study Guide

Test?  What test? The test on rational numbers for 7T is on Wednesday, November 1; and 6I’s test will be on Thursday, November 2.
You will be assessed for Criterion A: Knowing and understanding
Be sure to bring a silent reading book with you for if you finish before others.
Key ideas to know: For this test you should be able to explain: What is a rational number?  What is an irrational number?What does a fraction tell us?What does a decimal number tell us?How do we name a fraction or decimal number?What are the "Famous Fractions" and their decimal equivalents?How do we convert between fractions and decimal numbers?Where do rational numbers go on a number line?How does one rational number compare to another?How can we tell which is larger or smaller?How can benchmarks be used to understand the value of a rational number?What do the different vocabulary words we learned mean?How can we simplify a fraction (or reduce or put it into lowest terms)

How can you get ready? Go through you…

Grade Seven: What comes next?

Image
Seventh graders have had a number of different activities in class (and the computer lab) to help them get a better sense of where decimal numbers go on a number line and how they relate to each other.  Here are photos from a couple of them.










Grade Seven: Test info

Dates have been set for a test for seventh graders.  7T will take theirs on Wednesday, November 1; and 7I will take theirs on Thursday, November 2.

The test will be a look at rational numbers.  The focus will be the values of fractions and decimals and how they are related to each other.  Key ideas include:

What is a rational number?  What is an irrational number?What does a fraction tell us?What does a decimal number tell us?How do we read a fraction or decimal number?What are the "Famous Fractions" and their decimal equivalents?How do we convert between fractions and decimal numbers?Where do rational numbers go on a number line?How does one rational number compare to another?How can benchmarks be used to understand the value of a rational number?Resources for studying will be posted here shortly.

Grade Six: Reviewing the Roman number system

Image
Sixth graders have been gaining a better understanding of the Roman numeral system.  Time has been spent in class practicing and reviewing.  However, most students should continue practicing at home.  All sixth graders made number cards that can be used.  Parents can call out a number under 4,000 and their son or daughter can make it with the cards—or parents can build a number with the cards and the sixth grader can tell what its value is in our system.
Below are some other ways that you sixth graders can prepare for next Monday’s quiz.
This is a website that has a very complete explanation of the Roman system. It also has a converter where you can enter a Roman number and get its Hindu-Arabic equivalent. The site also has a link to worksheets that you can print off for more practice it you want. http://www.dadsworksheets.com/roman-numeral-converter.html
Here is a website that reviews the rules and also has some practice questions at the very bottom of it. https://www.mathsisfun.com/roma…

Happy birthday, IXL!

Image
Happy birthday, IXL!
IXL is celebrating ten years of offering students math practice (how many of those years have you been using it for?).  They will be doing some celebrating starting tomorrow, October 18.  Look at your IXL page for more information.

Grade Six: Posters

Image
The sixth graders’ “How Much is a Million?” posters have been marked and mini-rubrics have been sent home.  Parents are asked to review them with their son or daughter and then sign it and return to me.  Although, you can’t read the details too well, take a look at the posters that are now hanging on the classroom walls.

In the last class period, we used the writing from the posters to analyze what is needed to clearly communicate math ideas.





Games

Image
I often use games and activities in my math classes.  I believe that they are an effective way to help students develop and deepen understanding (and they are fun).  Sometimes, parents think that games are not “serious” math or that they are just for elementary students.  I disagree, as do most experts in the field.  Games should be part of a middle school math program.
Below is an excerpt from an article that I recently read.  I hope you find it interesting.
Games require a variety of problem-solving skills, such as making and testing hypotheses, creating strategies (thinking and planning ahead), and organizing information.   Plus, as children play, they further their development of hand-eye coordination, concentration levels, visual discrimination, memory, and their ability to communicate and use mathematical language.

Games can provide an atmosphere where children are encouraged to: share their ideas with others - think, discuss, and explainbe alert, interested, curious, and challenged…